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Entries related to: st

Oscar Romero: Journey to Sainthood

Oscar Romero, Archbishop of San Salvador, was gunned down on March 24, 1980, while celebrating Mass. Over the next few days, his body lay in state in the cathedral where he had so often preached. Thousands of mourners filed past his coffin, many of them campesinos, landless peasants and field workers, who had traveled miles to be there.
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Models of Faith: Mother Teresa

It’s an image known to many the world over: An elderly nun of unremarkable size, dressed in a white sari, takes into her arms a sickly child from the gutters of Calcutta. The nun carries the child to a bed in an overcrowded room, where she, aided by sisters in her order and other volunteers, spend the coming hours nursing the sick, feeding the hungry and comforting the dying.
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Saint Clare of Assisi: A Little Plant or a Mighty Oak?

East of the Piazza del Commune in Assisi, stands the Cathedral of San Rufino. Near the church and its adjacent piazza once stood the home of the nobleman and knight, Favarone Offreduccio and his wife, Ortulana. On July 16, 1193 or 1194, Ortulana gave birth to their first of three daughters whom they named Chiara.
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Was Saint Francis a Poet?

A little-known fact about Saint Francis of Assisi is that he is considered one of the first Italian poets by literary critics. His “Canticle of the Creatures” combined his love for God with his mastery of poetry.
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The Life and Times of Thérèse of Lisieux

Born toward the end of the nineteenth century, Thérèse entered the world when middle-class religion in France was narrow and rule-bound. The French Revolution toppled the Church in France from its position of power. Liberty, equality and fraternity, the watchwords of the new secular society, were held suspect by religious people, who tended to distance themselves from politics and the wider culture.
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Holy Quotes from Franciscan Saints

In my book, The Franciscan Saints, I selected more than a hundred Franciscans—many, but not all, drawn from the long list of official Franciscan saints.  Beginning with the founders, Francis and Clare and their first generation of followers, they include friars, women religious, and the diverse family of tertiary or Third Order Franciscans, a company comprised of laypeople, clergy, and even popes.
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Saints: Our Guides to God

A loving God offers us friendship, and the result of that gracious act is our holiness. God alone is holy: to be God is to be holy. Not to be God is not to be holy. It is not right or natural for us to live the life of God. But God creates God’s own life in us and makes it right for God to love us. When God finds divine life and love in us, it becomes natural for us to live supernatural or divine lives.
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Thank You, Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton

Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton is one of the keystones of the Catholic Church in United States. She founded the first religious community of the American Catholic Church—the Sisters of Charity. She opened the first American parish school and established the first American Catholic orphanage. She did all of this in the span of five or six years while raising her five children.
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We Are All Called to be Saints

Everybody loves the saints, but how many of us can really relate to them? This presents a problem. To begin with, although we read the lives of the saints and admire them, most of us cannot imagine ourselves in that sacred company. Of course, we know that, besides the more “famous” saints, there are those who will never be honored by the Church with miracles and a feast day.
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Saint Francis for Seekers

Over 40 years ago, a gentle Franciscan high school teacher penned a seminal book about Saint Francis. It wasn’t a biography or a treatise on the little Poor Man of Assisi but a romantic, imaginative work that presents the saint from the inside out. Francis is a saint for seekers because he was one himself. He first set out to be a knight, fighting with the army of Walter of Brienne, was captured and taken prisoner in Perugia. He returned to Assisi, a sick and melancholy 22-year-old who didn’t know what to do with himself.
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