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Entries related to: franciscan-spirituality

What's Not-So-Special about Franciscan Spirituality

Some of my Franciscan sisters and brothers will not like what I’m about to write here. And what I’m about to say can easily be misunderstood, so I will try my best to be clear: Contrary to popular belief, there is nothing particularly special about Franciscan spirituality!
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The Paradox of Franciscan Spirituality

Franciscan spirituality boldly puts a big exclamation point behind Jesus’s words that “The last will be first and the first will be last!” and Paul’s “When I am weak I am strong!” Upside-downness is at the heart of our message, always prompting us to look more deeply and broadly. is opens up our eyes to recognize God’s self-giving at the far edges where most of us cannot or will not see God, such as other religions, any who are defined as outsider or sinner, and even to the far edge of our seeing, toward those who are against us—our so-called enemies. 
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Finding Saints Francis and Clare

The Swiss Air flight from Zurich to Rome is the last stretch on a journey that’s proven one thing: I am simply not built for long flights. I’m taller than average: long on legs, short on tolerance for tight spaces. Sleep is impossible and sitting still for hours is a chore. It’s my mind, though, that is my true adversary: Every time I’m in the air, Don McLean’s “American Pie” plays in my head like a cerebral iPod with a grudge. But all fears and discomfort vanish as our airplane descends over a spectacular Italian wheat field ablaze with a gold I have never seen. I know I’m not in Cincinnati anymore.
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Saint Francis: A Holy Life

His name was Francis, the son of Pietro Bernardone, a cloth-merchant, and Lady Pica, who was of French origin. They lived in Assisi, Italy in the late twelfth and early thirteenth century.  He was a man born of wealth, a leader who dreamed of knighthood and who went to war on a high steed only to be brought low to the earth in defeat and imprisonment that marked him with what has been the fate of countless soldiers and prisoners of war throughout the centuries. 
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Saint Clare of Assisi: A Little Plant or a Mighty Oak?

East of the Piazza del Commune in Assisi, stands the Cathedral of San Rufino. Near the church and its adjacent piazza once stood the home of the nobleman and knight, Favarone Offreduccio and his wife, Ortulana. On July 16, 1193 or 1194, Ortulana gave birth to their first of three daughters whom they named Chiara.
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Take Nothing for the Journey: Living with Less on Pilgrimage in Assisi

I turned away from the lost-and-found baggage counter at the airport in Rome. Over the course of the last two and-a-half hours, it had become clear that if my suitcase was anywhere in the airport, no one could tell me exactly where that might be. I had waited in line for over an hour, been shown into a room full of unclaimed bags and asked if mine was among them (it wasn't), then waited in line again to file a report. 
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Br. Casey Cole on the Franciscan Spirit

  What is it about the Franciscan spirit that draws so many people in? Br. Casey Cole, OFM, says it's an unmistakable sense of family that makes it so appealing. And Saint Francis wouldn't have it any other way. "Francis wanted everybody to live this life," Br. Casey says. "He wanted people to live the Gospel." In this week's Friar Friday video, Br. Casey delves deeper into the Franciscan spirit and how it enriches the faith lives of those it touches.
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What Is the Franciscan Spirit?

As you can see, we have changed the name of our blog from American Catholic to Franciscan Spirit. We feel it better represents our mission: to spread the Gospel in the spirit of our founder, Saint Francis of Assisi. But what is the Franciscan spirit? 
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Live Like Saint Francis

His name was Saint Francis of Assisi, and he used to praise God the Artist in every one of God’s works. Whatever joy he found in things made, he referred to their maker. He rejoiced in all the works of God’s hands. Everything cried out to him, “He who made us is infinitely good!” He called animals “brother” or “sister,” and he exhorted them to praise God. He would go through the streets and byways, inviting everyone to sing with him. And one time when he came upon an almond tree, he said, “Brother Almond, speak to me of God.” And the almond tree blossomed.
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Saint Francis for Seekers

Over 40 years ago, a gentle Franciscan high school teacher penned a seminal book about Saint Francis. It wasn’t a biography or a treatise on the little Poor Man of Assisi but a romantic, imaginative work that presents the saint from the inside out. Francis is a saint for seekers because he was one himself. He first set out to be a knight, fighting with the army of Walter of Brienne, was captured and taken prisoner in Perugia. He returned to Assisi, a sick and melancholy 22-year-old who didn’t know what to do with himself.
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