Recent Posts

Doubt Is a Wound

God did not abandon Thomas in his doubt, nor does he abandon us. Our God, after all, is full of compassion and patience. Doubt is a wound we all share. It is a wound that God longs to heal with his divine mercy.

 

from the book Meeting God in the Upper Room: Three Moments to Change Your Life

God in the Garden

In the beginning, God made a garden, rich with compost and humus, a black loam that smelled of dawn. Seeds began sprouting in this soil; trees’ roots wound deep within it as their branches reached toward the sun; grass, clover, and forbs of every kind spread over the earth in a green and golden carpet. God took some of this dirt, made muddy with dew, and formed a creature from it—a body of soil. Bending down, God breathed spirit, animus, into the earth so that it became an animal—a living thing. And God gave this animal something different from the others—a purpose, a call, an invitation to join God in moving the creation toward its flourishing. God put this humus-man, this human, in the garden and gave it a call—a vocation. God put the human in a place cultivated toward its fullness—a garden—and called the human to “cultivate it and keep it” (Genesis 2:15), to bring it to life and yet to respect its integrity.

from Wendell Berry and the Given Life

 

The Joy of the Gospel

There are so many needy people who hunger—but not for bread, they have plenty of bread—but for God! Go there, to tell this truth: Jesus Christ is the Lord and he saves you. But always go and touch the flesh of Christ! The Gospel cannot be preached purely intellectually: the Gospel is truth but it is also love and it is also beauty! And this is truly the joy of the Gospel!

from The Spirit of Saint Francis

Easter Celebration

The joy of the risen Lord is the sunshine of our Father’s love. The joy of Jesus is the hope of eternal happiness. The joy of Jesus is the flame of burning love. Easter is this joy. However, you cannot have joy without sacrifice. That is why Good Friday comes before Easter.

from the book: Thirsting for God: Daily Meditations

Victory of the Cross

Importantly, the cross does not have the last word. His resurrection does. Without the resurrection, the cross would be a seal of failure. Instead the cross is a sign of victory.

The Fruit of Suffering

Suffering gives you the opportunity to grow. Your trials give you a gift: the opportunity to become the person you always wanted to become. A holier person. A more patient person. A person who endures. A person who is kinder. A person who is more merciful.

from When You Suffer

New Life

The resurrection of Jesus is not simply a pledge of a new life in the future, but rather an affirmation that the new life Jesus has promised has already begun. St. Paul once urged the new Christians in Corinth to allow God to be “everything in all of you.” The resurrection of Jesus shows the type of life toward which God’s grace and mercy will always lead each of us—if we allow that.

from the book Peace and Good

 

The Risen Lord

As the darkness of Good Friday gives way to the jubilant “Alleluia” of Easter, we profess our faith with all the joy of St. Thomas in seeing the Risen Lord. “My Lord and my God!” (John 20:28).

 

–from Meeting God in the Upper Room: Three Moments to Change Your Life


Holy Saturday

Holy Saturday is, as it were, a symbol of everyday life which is a mean between the abysmal terror of Good Friday and the exuberant joy of Easter. The Holy Saturday of our life must be the preparation for Easter, the persistent hope for the final glory of God. If we live the Holy Saturday of our existence properly, this will not be a merely ideological addition to this common life as the mean between its contraries. It is realized in what makes our everyday life specifically human: in the patience that can wait, in the sense of humor which does not take things too seriously, in being prepared to let others be first, in the courage which always seeks for a way out of the difficulties. –Karl Rahner

from the book Prayer in the Catholic Tradition

A Time of Transition

God of all time, you call us out of the ordinariness of our everyday lives to see the world anew in your time. Help us to respond to your call to see in all things: both a completion and a new beginning; both an end and a renewed start; both sadness and joy. While our time marks your death on a cross as an end, your time marks the Transitus from one life to the next. Enflame in our hearts a desire to see in life and death the Transitus and transformation your life, death, and resurrection have brought forth in the world. Your time is a time of fulfillment that makes little sense to the world, for what is logical is replaced by what is kingdom-oriented, and this way of thinking appears as foolishness to the worldly. Help us to live as your fools, willing to announce your kingdom. Give us the strength to keep your time, where relationships take priority and we start over again and again to serve the least among us. Amen.

–from the book The Last Words of Jesus: A Meditation on Love and Suffering