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Entries related to: richard-rohr

Richard Rohr on the Legacy of Thomas Merton

I only saw Thomas Merton once. He walked in front of my family and me when we were visiting the Abbey of Gethsemani in early June 1961. I had read Sign of Jonah and Waters of Siloe in the high school seminary in Cincinnati, and already my youthful mind intuitively knew that this man was a prophet for my soul and for the Church in the world. So, on the day of my graduation and return to Kansas for the summer, I said to my parents, “Let’s take the southern route home. I have a place I want you to see.” Little did I imagine!
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Richard Rohr on Saint Francis and Saint Paul

Saint Francis of Assisi was a right-brain thinker, drawing on intuitions and emotional creativity as he set out to follow the Gospel. Saint Paul of Tarsus, a millennium earlier, had preached the Gospel—from a left-brain perspective—using his scholarly training and logic to bring the good news outside the walls of Jerusalem. According to Richard Rohr—Franciscan teacher, preacher, and author—there are connections between the different thinking of Saint Paul and Saint Francis, two of his spiritual heroes. They are mentors on Rohr’s spiritual journey that can guide others on theirs. He sees in Saints Paul and Francis differing perspectives, which were and are needed by the Church then and today.
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5 Books on Catholic Saints to Read This Year

  If your New Year's resolution is to pay more attention to your spiritual life, then let the saints be your guide! These 5 books offer inspiration from Catholic saints to help you deepen your practices of prayer and virtue.
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The Paradox of Franciscan Spirituality

  Franciscan spirituality boldly puts a big exclamation point behind Jesus’s words that “The last will be first and the first will be last!” and Paul’s “When I am weak I am strong!” Upside-downness is at the heart of our message, always prompting us to look more deeply and broadly. is opens up our eyes to recognize God’s self-giving at the far edges where most of us cannot or will not see God, such as other religions, any who are defined as outsider or sinner, and even to the far edge of our seeing, toward those who are against us—our so-called enemies. 
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