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The Franciscan Saints: Marianne Cope

Third Order Regular, Servant of the Lepers (1838–1918) Barbara Koob, who was born in Germany, immigrated with her family to the United States when she was less than two years old. At the port of entry, the family name became Cope. In 1862, Barbara entered the Third Order Regular of Franciscans and received her religious name, Sr. Marianne.
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The Franciscan Saints: Junipero Serra

Franciscan Missionary (1713–1784) Junipero Serra is celebrated as one of the fathers of California. Born in Majorca, Serra entered the Franciscan order at sixteen. After earning a doctorate in theology, he taught as a professor for many years before volunteering for the missions in New Spain.
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The Franciscan Saints: Thomas More

Martyr, Third Order Franciscan (1478–1535) Thomas More was one of the most highly respected men of his time. A successful barrister, an honest judge, a famous scholar, he rose to the highest status of any commoner in England, appointed by Henry VIII to the office of lord chancellor.
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The Franciscan Saints: John Duns Scotus

Franciscan Theologian (ca. 1266–1308) John Duns, later known as the Subtle Doctor, was called Scotus on account of his birth in Scotland. He entered the Franciscans at the age of fifteen and was later ordained a priest. After studies in Oxford and Paris, he went on to hold teaching positions in Paris and Cologne, where he was acclaimed as one of the greatest of the Scholastic theologians. 
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The Franciscan Saints: Jacopone Benedetti

Franciscan Poet (1230–1306) Jacopone Benedetti was a prosperous lawyer in the Umbrian town of Todi. His life took a tragic turn one day when his young wife was killed in an accident. This terrible loss was compounded by the belated discovery of his wife’s piety. As she lay dying before his eyes, he loosened her gown and was surprised and deeply moved to find that she wore a secret hair shirt, a penance he believed she must have undertaken to atone for his own sins. 
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The Franciscan Saints: Agnes of Bohemia

Princess and Abbess (ca. 1203–1280) Agnes was born in Prague, where her father was the king of Bohemia. Despite the privileges of her station, she enjoyed no freedom to decide her own destiny. She was simply a commodity to be invested wherever she might bring the highest return for her family and its dynastic interests. Starting at the age of three, she was shipped to various kingdoms and betrothed to strangers she had never met. Through chance or providence, all these engagements came to naught.
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The Franciscan Saints: Maximilian Kolbe

Franciscan Martyr (1894–1941) On July 30, 1941, a prisoner escaped from Auschwitz, the notorious Nazi camp in Poland. In retaliation, the commandant lined up inmates of cell block fourteen and ordered that ten of them be selected for death. When one of the ten cried out that he would never see his family again, another prisoner stepped forward and volunteered to take his place.
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Following Jesus Through Life's Traffic Jams

I was driving home from Myrtle Beach with my sisters and we came across a heavy load of traffic just as we were passing through the Smokey Mountains. Without traffic, we probably still had four hours left, but with the newfound obstacle in our way, Apple Maps was saying that we had 6 1/2 hours. Oh, the joy! I’m pretty sure that everyone’s patience is sucked out of them whilst in traffic jams, and this case was no different. 
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Saint Kateri Tekakwitha: Princess of the Eucharist

For many years, American Catholics who wanted to follow in the footsteps of a saint had to travel to Europe. In Assisi, they could step where Saint Francis did. In Ireland, they might walk the byways of Saint Patrick. It wasn’t until the late-20th-century canonizations of Sister Elizabeth Ann Seton, born in New York City in 1774, and Sister Katharine Drexel, born in Philadelphia in 1858, that Americans finally had the opportunity to stay in the country when visiting places where U.S.-born saints lived and worked.
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Take Nothing for the Journey: Living with Less on Pilgrimage in Assisi

I turned away from the lost-and-found baggage counter at the airport in Rome. Over the course of the last two and-a-half hours, it had become clear that if my suitcase was anywhere in the airport, no one could tell me exactly where that might be. I had waited in line for over an hour, been shown into a room full of unclaimed bags and asked if mine was among them (it wasn't), then waited in line again to file a report. 
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